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heard the word innovation, i have to put a plug in for tradition. i have a very traditional education. i spent a lot of years in silence speaking latin up in the hills, living within the medieval framework. i do respect the past. we study it. if you are grounded in tradition, you feel quite confident in change and innovation. if you are insecure, you are very reluctant to embrace the unknown. i do think we need to in our education and politics, we have to have a new appreciation for our traditions and the patterns that describe our culture and our being as americans. having said all that, we have saved in california tens of billions in energy efficiency. when i first adopted those, people reacted negatively. we pushed ahead. and now in california we have ab 32. signed by a republican actor turned governor. promoting something i pick up on and promote further. the number of people in silicon valley defended ab23 against -- ab32 against an onslaught of texas oil companies. we defend when they tried to block your business. california gets 50% of the venture capital. there is a lot going on
, the culture. they want education, they want a better transit system. they always have ideas to improve the municipal transit system. but when the talk about the bay area, including silicon valley, it is the same thing. transportation symptom -- systems, central subway, high- speed rail. clearly, bart to san jose has been incredibly important to everyone, so that people could travel. i think there is a lot more maturity. there are many successful company that have already turned a corner on making a profit. start-ups have long-term views. they are not looking for instant gratification, as i believe the attitude was in the late 1990's, 2000's. people are talking a lot about issues on stability and asking government, like ours, to be with them in the long term, and to create relationships. certainly, for capital investors, it really is that relationship building. they want that face-to-face time with investors around our city. so we are creating conditions for that to happen. they are not short-term leases, these are long-term leases. twitter signed in for a good 10 years. others have sig
organization as a result of an agreement we have with the department of justice and department of education, so that we don't have any antitrust issues. that is an independent group. we at the american bar association are asking law schools to prepare for -- prepare 10 simple questions about what it costs to go to law school, how many of their students are employed upon graduation in real jobs, not artificial jobs, and we think it is going to be helpful. we also have a website that has a lot of information for anyone considering to go to law school, but probably the most important statistic that these potential students don't know is that the median income of lawyers in the united states is $62,000. they need to understand that before they incur $100,000 in debt. is there always room for another good lawyer? we need good lawyers. there always is. you have to ask yourself how much that you can afford -- how much debt you can afford. they have been watching too much "boston legal." you see $100,000 starting salaries. that may be for the top 10 students at the top 10 law schools. there were 30,000
education. so that gets us how do we deal with educational site. i do want to go into that. then you come to the question of how do you come how do we make a more effective and priority. i don't know how it happened, but we stuck with the history stuck with a history in a is that was very excellent education. and we. and were regarded as everybody basically is back to the ford model. you have kindergarten through 12, then you go to college, and if you haven't achieved that you are really worthless, right? so that's not working. i think we have to go back to origin and say let's make it more flexible and let's also bring -- you asked early on where is opportunity. i think that is the most natural opportunity for cooperation to, in fact, it's happening already. we have a number of programs on the way they successfully. there's a big challenge there, and that is a challenge that most people today that goes when education system don't even understand what a manufacturing job looks like. the image that they have been manufactured you is you come in early in the month with a white shirt and you
% and it will essentially be cut close to happen the next decade. we are talking about education programs and health programs, including nih research. we are talking about infrastructure. we are talking about key domestic discretionary programs that are so important for the lives of the vast majority of the american people. as the president subsequently yesterday, the debt ceiling essentially must not be used as a weapon. it essentially takes on an is the basic full faith and credit of the united states of america. the president has made so clear what would be at stake if that were to happen. i just believe that it is so critical that that not occurred. you know, i have been through these battles for many decades. i don't remember anyone essentially saying we should go over the cliff. the consequences would be, i think, shamanic and potentially cataclysmic. for the republicans that say let's do it, i think i would be a mistake with foreseeable consequences. the federal reserve has said the responsible physician is we should not forget. >> the president says he's not going to talk about the debt ceil
read your articles every day for the past year or two. you have educated me. you have enhanced my knowledge of a lot of things that i have heard that comes out of the republicans or conservative talk-show hosts by criticize obama. after reading your article, i found out what i hear on a rush limbaugh and the michael savage show was absolutely a lie. host: you give us an example? caller: a whole solyndra tuition. i found out the facts by reading your article in our local paper. the whole solyndra thing started with the bush administration. guest: thanks for the kind words. i am glad that you are reading them in your local paper one thing we are trying to do, as much as we can, is get our work out in different ways. we have partnerships with television stations. have partnerships with newspapers. the one you are read for into in atlanta uses the truth-o-meter on state and local officials. i am glad to hear you are reading our work and their work and i am happy our word is getting out host:politifact looked at issues -- looks at issues like energy. what to do find overall? guest: a l
. there is a disadvantage to a piecemeal bill, if you pass, for example, issues for educated people to get a visa, and they're taking care of, you lose a certain amount of support for the other issues. i do not think we should decide that. i think the senator is doing a great service by raising this issue. i think our colleagues at this meeting, i met this morning with the person -- he and i actually talk a lot. i believe we should move forward on all of the arrangements so that the hill will develop an understanding about all of these issues and finally decide whether they will do it in one, too, or three pieces. that is the least of our worry. the fact is they do it. we will continue to talk about a comprehensive bill. >> i am delighted that senator rubio is helping folks take the issue of immigration reform as seriously as he is taking it. he is providing leadership on that and we are appreciative. i think it is great to see movement on both sides of the aisle. whether or not it is comprehensive or individual pieces is to be determined by leadership in the house and senate in consultation with the presi
of it. where to begin? no matter what your leanings are and whether you know about education or not, let's turn to some of the language you are talking about. investing in very young children is the best investment you can make. it has the greatest return on investment. we know that because the first years of life are the most important for cognitive, social, and emotional development. you are only two years old ones. that is the most significant window of time. which brings me to the next point, yes, we have class warfare. those who are poor are completely left out of the national dialogue on poverty and hunger. that is a bipartisan effort, to keep people who are poor out of the national dialogue. that is why i work with low income women to be able to take photographs and provide direct testimony on their experiences with raising children in poverty, how to break cycles with poverty, and there are so many conversations happening. this concept of violence and the trail. people have been silenced for so many years. -- betrayal. people have been silenced for so many years. poverty is solva
have some extraordinary assets in this country. we have a highly educated and motivated work force that in many respects outperforms, not out educated about from a point of view workers in virtually every effort country. we have the most efficient capital markets in the world. our companies have the lowest cost of capital of any companies anywhere around the globe. we have a spirit of entrepreneurship and innovation and capitalist system and commitment to a capitalist system that is the envy of virtually every other country in the world, and we also have increasingly as elude it to in the earlier panel have always had a very strong natural resources, but with shale oil and gas and the incredible strength of our agricultural industry we have a great natural resources as well so there's a lot to be bullish about in this country in terms of our economic opportunities, but this fiscal deficit, our fiscal policy is an enormous cloud on us reaching that potential and i work on the investment banking industry i used to be in the money-management industry. there is a phrase that sometimes
to succeed in today's market place. despate progress in education, too many of our schools are still lagging behind, some way behind and especially heart breaking to this father, one in five hoosier children lives in poverty. that is simply unacceptable. [applause] with so many families and business struggling just to get by we have no choice but to remain bold. we have to do better and we will do better and doing better starts with the right priorities. by adopting a road map that says yes to our future and believes in the ununlimited potential of our people and it start by making job creation job one in this assembly and all over this state. [applause] that's why on day one of our administration i signed a moratorium on any regulations to ensure that indiana is not burdening hoosiers employ remembers unnecessary red tape and that's why we proposed a job budget last week. our budget is honestly balanced holds the line on spending, funds our priorities, builds our reserves and it lets hard working hoosiers keep more of what they earned. now let's be clear: government doesn't create jo
of service and to educate small businesses on action steps to achieve accessibility compliance. dbi is meeting with the office of small business to determine the most appropriate use of these very limited funds. and which are the result of passage of senate bill, 1186 by the state legislature last september so that is something that is important to us based on the conversations in the past. >> acting director, director and i have recently met with the office of small business to executive director to discuss ongoing compliance issues around the number of vacant commercial storefronts. >> it does not appear that it could effectively address, vacant storefronts especially in buildings otherwise occupied. we remain available for follow up discussions on these issues. these conversations are helpful and we obviously can't accomplish the goals all of the time. but at least the communication we can come up with creative ways of assisting these issues to the department. >> dbi along with other departments is participating in the data survey, at the request of small business and the mayor's
organizational effectiveness and improved doctrine, education, training and exercises. the directive comes with an already increased attention on dsca which we have seen the development of courses and training now delivered at multiple professional military education programs and other venues and the maturing of thinking and policies since 9/11 and katrina. there is a recognition within this analysis that there are gaps in awareness of the capabilities dod can provide in complex catastrophes, as well as the inherent complexities and lack of understanding in our various chains of command and our authorities. the report recognizes what we have used to drive the dsca portion of fleet week, that local authorities are likely to be overwhelmed in a complex catastrophe and that the president will direct support to civil authorities. that san francisco fleet week assumption is now stated as a guiding principle inside the dod for planning and activities. the objective of the dod effort is to enable the effective access to and use of defense capabilities in the event of a disaster. critical to thi
apply it? how do we deliver band width that can change education, change health care, change all government services, we get faster, cheaper, better, the same phenomenon on our phones and in our networks, we want to see in public goods and services like education and health care. >> host: mr. levin, how important is speed when it comes to improving our economy? >> guest: depends on a variety of different uses. for example in medicine, we're now moving to a place where we can have wireless sensors improve medicine and that's great. but business uses and other thing things, cameras, geneomic medicine, there's faster networks, president clinton was was dell and he said we can't expect our businesses to compete internationally if they only have access the speed of korea, and he is absolutely right. >> reed hundt, energy is included in your book on technology. why? >> guest: to quote the smashing pumpkins, we all know what we're after, we just have to get there faster. we all know we need a clean energy economy, where it's really, really cheap to buy the energy and where the energy th
've only felt that the public itself needed to be engaged more on financial reform, to educate themselves better, make an issue with their elected officials. i have some policy recommendations at the end of the. i hope people will look at this recent. >> the former head of the fdic, sheila bair on the government's role during the country's worst financial crisis since the depression. her book is "bull by the horns." sunday night at eight on c-span's q&a. >> next comic kansas governor sam brownback delivers his third state of the state address. in his remarks before the joint session of the house and senate, he gave his plans for balancing the state budget which faces a projected shortfall of $267 million for the fiscal year beginning july 1. this event in topeka is 25 minutes. >> good evening. mr. speaker, madam president, -- [applause] you jumped my laundry now going to have to repeat. you will have to do that again, i hope. i was just looking at her thinking there's a lot of new faces here. welcome. good to have you in the legislature. it's going to be a great you and they do have befor
as a psychologist having problems with one of my troops i would try and educate them on some of the information and how a person who's suffering from ptsd might comport themselves in the challenges they would have specifically. by providing that information to the commanders that were ahead of the person in the unit, they were able to understand and maybe take a different factor towards helping the person. >> thank you. >> to have the senior flag officers testify of course and also waiting throughout the morning panel used to have a practice at the commission that the government witnesses would be on the first panel and they object to that inappropriate cases but the reason i'm pointing it out -- i will mention one other thing. the past few times we've invited someone from the department of justice the federal law mandates all federal agencies shall cooperate fully with the commission. they won't send to testify at any time in the past couple of years. so it kind of the allies at least one false myth and that is that the military doesn't take this issue very seriously. so after trying to compli
before imagination and creativity have crashed. largely -- 90% of the people educated -- that's what i never took a course in english at the university because i feared the deadening effect of the conventional view of literature. i'm glad i did it. i took the examination. >> it worked out pretty well for you. >> exactly. i'm how to write and i have my own idea that i didn't need to listen to the conventional wisdom i already knew was wrong last night. >> i take issue with the idea we have a scientifically -- i don't think we have a scientific illiterate populace but it looks that way because we're the most sophisticated scientific structure organization. the science community in the world over the world has ever seen in this country. and so i agree there is a gap between the professional and the public come and that's a problem but i don't think -- there is a certain amount of illiteracy. all kinds of illiteracy among all populace this large. it's just there's this big difference between us. the question there is -- >> the decline do in both scientific funding, awareness, and ambition
networking. here's author and educator lou heckler. >> there was this story in our local paper a while back. a married couple was sitting on a love seat in their home, virtually knee-to-knee. each had a laptop computer and they were typing. the interviewer asked them what they were doing. the answer: "we're arguing about something and we're doing it so our friends can be part of the discussion." is that really connecting in the way all these social networks are supposed to help us do? funny, isn't it? we have the power to be more electronically networked than ever before, but are we really connected? when we ask someone today if they have lots of friends, do they answer with actual, physical friends or electronic friends? i'm not in the 25-35 demographic, so maybe i see things differently. to me, connection comes from finding an area of common interest; exploring that interest with others and physical contact with one another. if i read something online about a friend and want to talk with them about it, i call them. i want to hear their voice, feel their emotion, share their joy or pain. i
. there was the brown versus board of education decision. there was the killing of the civil rights workers. it was people like barbara jones, the young high school student who led a walkout of the segregated schools to protest against the inferior education. that's in 1951. many people we don't even know their names oregon before rosa parks in montgomery. there were two other teenagers who did the same thing. so this resistance largely among young people. >> host: always among the young. >> guest: when we talk about south africa it was the students and saleh though. we all remember nelson mandela. nelson mandela was in a prison. it was the students stephen eco-who revived a movement in the early 70's and late 60's. >> host: there was james sybil talking about children the young people leading the way. he did something that got a lot of criticism for him and for dr. king. tell the story about the children's movement. >> guest: again, king was at a crucial point. we have the image the king gave the direction and he had a margin people across the country followed him. that is wrong. from mont
of education decision. as people like barbara johns, the high school student that led a walkout of the segregated school because of protesting in the interior education. that's in 1951 we don't even know their names anymore even with rosa parks and montgomery. there were two other teenagers who did the same thing. as of this resistance, largely among the young people. >> host: on both sides is and it? >> guest: definitely. when you talk about south africa we all remember nelson mandela it was the students and others that revised the movement that was more abundant in the late 60's. >> host: he did something that got a lot of criticism for him and dr. king. tell that story about the crusade. >> guest: he was at a crucial point in birmingham. he gave a direction in march and millions of people followed him, completely wrong. from montgomery which came didn't initiate through birmingham, king is a leader but only in birmingham can he initiate and sustain the movement but that point in april of 1963 all of the people that are adults that are looking to get arrested had already been
vs. board of education decision killing of civil-rights workers, the young high-school student who led a walkout to protest against fifth inferior education. 1951. many people we don't even know there names or other teenagers who did the same thing. so the resistance largely among young people. >> definitely when you talk about south africa, we all remember nelson mandela who was in a prison cell. for others to revived a movement in the early '70s and the late '60s. >> host: talking about children, james did something that got a lot of criticism for him and dr. king. >> guest: king was at a crucial point* in birmingham with millions of people across the country followed him. from montgomery which king did not initiate, through birmingham, king is a leader in search of a following. only in birmingham can he initiate and sustain a movement the dow reached a crucial point* in 1963 all those who were adults who were willing to get arrested already had been arrested. he writes his letter from the birmingham jail. it was not clear he bush win in birmingham. if he lost there would be no m
, michigan also is diversifying, bringing in high-tech, various kinds of service, health care, education and so on. and places like university of michigan, ann arbor, are a tremendous resource for entrepreneurs, people trying to develop new high-tech business businesses. so it is a good sign to see that america still has a powerful industrial base but it is diversifying into a wide range of new types of industries. so it is a large and complex economy. i don't know if you want to talk about the broader economy or not, but you could come back to it if you like, but you know, we have been seeing some improvement in the labor market, it's still not we would like it to be. growth has been moderate. there are some positive signs to look at, and i think one of the key positives, i made reference to, is housing. as you know, house prices in the u.s. felt about 30% and the amount of construction felt extraordinary over this recession. and now for the first time, really since 2007, 2006, we are starting to see increases in production, house prices, that will affect household wealth. that's one po
will essentially be cut close to have been the next decade. and so, we are talking about education programs. were talking about health programs, including nih research. were talking about infrastructure. we're talking that key domestic discretionary programs that are so important for the lives of the vast majority of the american people. so let me just say two things about that. number one, there has to be a balance. and number two, i think it is fido, as the president said so clearly yesterday, that the debt ceiling essentially must not use to say what then that essentially takes on and essentially undoes the basic full faith and credit of the united states of america. the president made so clear what would he have staked if that were to happen and i just think it's so critical that not occur. you know, i've been through these battles as i've said for many decades, but i don't remember anyone essentially saying we should go over the cliff in terms of the full faith and credit of the united states. the consequences with teeth, i think, to not take, potentially cataclysmic. and for the republicans
. we think that is very important at the brady center. we're involved in public education campaigns to educate people about the risks of guns and educate clinicians' about what they should know and to educate the public about what they can do to prevent gun crimes before they happen. there are a lot of sensible proposals that we can do to get at all aspects of this complex problem. host: this tweet from bill badey. is there a definition for that? guest: i think he means a gun show sell. that is not going to be relevant for the current debate. we have gone past that. people talked about closing the gun show loophole. the problem with that is that it is still left open internet sales and sales in the parking lot of those shows. we have gone past that. it will not be of little significance if we can require background checks on all gun sales. it will close the classified ad loopholes and all gun sales under one place. it is similar if we sold controlled substances where you would say the law requires you to get a prescription from a doctor and go to a pharmacy to buy drugs except when
on the vanguard and organizing against good business. they wanted to go back to the farm and have an educated population that would have some political power. now, i am not suggesting that this is a conspiracy by any means. this is simply people, the surplus that they operated in. what they perceived as self-interest. it is something that they probably thought were the best thing for the country. these men represented this interest and for the most part, they view the world through an urban lens. some of them grew up on a farm. replacing small farms with integrated ones that could supply the food companies with the raw ingredients that they needed. so the cdc lobbied against the new deal farm programs and they began to really successfully start chipping away at them in the 1950s during the eisenhower administration. in 1962, the cd published a report that was prepared by 50 influential business leaders and 18 economists from leading universities. it was called an adaptive program for agriculture, and it laid out his plan to drastically reduce the number of farmers and to create this large lab
is a distraction for corporate america. others point to our inferior infrastructure and sub-par public education. but adam segal, author of "advantage," says the big problem is others are gaining ground. >> we have been kind of running in place for the last three or four years because of the recession, spending on r&d, and big ideas seem to be fairly scarce while china just continues to funnel more and more money into it. >> reporter: still many argue the u.s. will always be extremely competitive because we are the most innovative country in the world. what better place to witness innovation at work than at i.b.m. in westchester county, new york. this is the home of watson, big blue's super computer. watson was clever enough to beat "jeopardy" champions at their own game just a few years ago. now, i.b.m. researchers are working on new uses for the brainiac computer, particularly in the field of medicine. bernie meyerson calls himself i.b.m.'s head geek. he says innovation is critical for companies and societies to survive and thrive. and yes, there is a magic ingredient. >> continuity. in the do
in this country. we have a highly educated and motivated workforce that in many respects outperforms, from a product to the point of view, workers in virtually every other country. we have the most efficient capital markets in the world. industry we have great natural resources as well. there's a lot to be bullish about in the country in terms of our economic opportunities. but this fiscal deficit our fiscal policy is an enormous cloud or retardant on us reaching that potential. you know, i work in the investment banking industry, i used to be in the money management industry. there's a phrase that sometimes get applied to companies and you would say about the company, good company but bad capital structure, and maybe bad management as well. that was used to describe a company that had, you know, great products, highly motivated work force, that was winning in the eyes of the consumer or whoever the purchase or products were. they maybe had too much debt or they had a management team or structure that just didn't take advantage of the enormous opportunities that they had in front of them.
of these soldiers coming back from world war ii going back to the farm and having an educated population, um, that would have some political power. now, i am not suggesting that this is a conspiracy by any means. this was simply people of like mind in their social clubs and in their, the circles that today operated in -- that they operated in acting in what they perceived as their self-interest. and, you know, for some of them probably they thought this was the best thing for the country. these men represented really disparate interests and, for the most part, they were technocrats. they viewed the world through this urban lens. some of them had grown up on farms, didn't think much of the idea. their definition of reforming agriculture meant substituting capital for farm labor and replacing small farms with large, vertically-integrated ones that could supply the food companies with the raw ingredients that they needed. so the ced and the business interests that they represented lobbied against the new deal farm programs, and they began to really successfully start chipping away at them in th
it is essential to get a deep understanding of mental health in terms of research education and policy. >> we expect to get more details on the vice president's recommendations. he shared with the president earlier this week. lawmakers aren't waiting there are a number of proposals in the works including one that would give a tax credit to any one who would turn in what lawmakers are calling an assault weapon and also another measure aimed at creating the overall bigger picture of mass violence. >> at the news conference the president accused republicans of trying to collect a ransom in exchange for not crashing the u.s. economy. they are demanding more spending cuts before they agree to raise the nation's debt ceiling. the debt ceiling is announcing the amount of money the states can borrow. today the president responded to some republicans who say they are willing to shut down the government if the president doesn't back down. ultimately congress makes decisions about whether or not we spend money and keep the government open. if they decide they want to shut down the government in order to
foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. hborhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbor? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighborhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ - hi, neighbor! i'm going to have breakfast. come on in! what do you usually have for breakfast? good morning, mom! - good morning, daniel. hi, neighbor. now, for breakfast, you can choose hot o
to helping battle obesity and educate consumers. >>> facebook is holding a top secret event tomorrow that has many people the the tech community guessing what it's all about. the only clue about the mysterious event came in a media invitation, which teases quote come see what we're building. some guesses include the debut of a facebook smartphone, or are a new search service that combines friends' recommendations with information from around the web. the event begins at 10:00 a.m. tomorrow. >>> apple's stock today slipped below $500 for the first time in nearly a year. the stock dropped more than $18 to $501.75. this came as apple reportedly cut orders for parts for its iphone 5 due to weak demand. according to one report, apple has asked several suppliers to cut their supply orders by half. they have been losing ground to samsung others in the smartphone market. apple has not commented on the report. >> the legal maneuvering in washington is being watched very closely in sacramento. >> when governor brown announced that his 2013 budget showed a surplus, many were surprised. today taylor stoo
has never been more devoted to helping battle obesity and educate consumers. >>> facebook is holding a top secret event tomorrow that has many people the the tech community guessing what it's all about. the only clue about the mysterious event came in a media invitation, which teases quote come see what we're building. some guesses include the debut of a facebook smartphone, or are a new search service that combines friends' recommendations with information from around the web. the event begins at 10:00 a.m. tomorrow. >>> apple's stock today slipped below $500 for the first time in nearly a year. the stock dropped more than $18 to $501.75. this came as apple reportedly cut orders for parts for its iphone 5 due to weak demand. according to one report, apple has asked several suppliers to cut their supply orders by half. they have been losing ground to samsung others in the smartphone market. apple has not commented on the report. >> the legal maneuvering in washington is being watched very closely in sacramento. >> when governor brown announced that his 2013 budget showed a surplus, m
education reform and he wants to amend the constitution. he will likely pick that up after the upper house election and keep working away on improving the economy. >>> pakistani politics is in turmoil once again. after the supreme court order, the arrest of the prime minister. we have following the story in bangkok. >>> request order for the arrest of prime minister comes amid large anti-government protests on the streets of capital islamabad. pakistan is facing a period of uncertainty ahead of a general election due within months. the court said tuesday it ordered the arrest of the prime minister in relation to allegations of corruption when he was the country's power minister from 2008. he became prime minister last june after his predecessor quit following his conviction for contempt of court. islamabad has been the site of demonstrations attracting tens of thousands of anti-government protesters. they are led by islamic cleric. he says the government is riddled with corruption and should resign. he also wants a disillusion of national assemblies. he says he will continue to lead protes
capital." the government plans to pour $250 billion a year into education. while the country's labor market is a skilled manufacturing force, its looking to raise the stakes for its middle class, which has been steadily growing. reports say corporations like ibm, intel and general motors are eager to hire graduates from china. competing against big box stores can be a david-versus- goliath experience for small retailers. 30 years ago, hardware chains and independents split sales 50/50. now, chains dominate. as paul eggers reports, it's making survival tough for the little guys. "gracias. que paso malala" jesus davila's hardware store, "la brocha gorda," has been a neighborhood fixture for some time, operating in a mostly mexican community on chicago's south side. "the shop has been open for 30 years already. it's been open since 1985. yolo que paso como estas" customers are still coming in, but davila plans to shut the doors in just a couple weeks. after making countless keys and helping out on hundreds of jobs, he's had enough. "let me tell you, i can do it, but i'm tired already."
for education and for clean up from the aftermath of these violent-related masacres. >> last word, thank you, folks. coming up, you don't have nonbuyers remorse because you missed out on these run ups. our informers have stocks you need right now. >>> at 4:00 this morning two intruders broke into the home of a woman and they demanded they give her cash. >> one of the men held me down and put a pillow on my face and kept yelling they want money. i never have been so scared in my life.
's use the money for education and for clean up from the aftermath of these violent-related masacres. >> last word, thank you, folks. coming up, you don't have nonbuyers remorse because you missed out on these run ups. our informers have stocks you need right now. overmany discounts to thine customs! [old english accent] safe driver, multi-car, paid in full -- a most fulsome bounty indeed, lord jamie. thou cometh and we thy saveth! what are you doing? we doth offer so many discounts, we have some to spare. oh, you have any of those homeowners discounts? here we go. thank you. he took my shield, my lady. these are troubling times in the kingdom. moreiscounts than we knoweth what to do with. now that's progressive. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day afr day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] e pill eachmorning. 24 hours. zero heartbur ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] a full life measured in seats starts with the right ones e
. this is the country joins. what training programs exist to educate judges about precedence over national law? is very national mechanism to promote de facto equality? if so, does it promote measures in developing policies? chemical professionals initiate lawsuits? if so, how many cases have been filed? at their quotas, targets or goals? if so, what are they? does the machinery attacked budget expenditures? for% is spent on women's programs, social issues, family programs? or their quotas, targets, specifics? et cetera, et cetera. to gender quotas exist for increasing women elected to government bodies? at a public education programs conducted by the state to emphasize the importance of balance representation in all elected bodies and so on? i condemned they are not universal human rights. they have little to do with equality of opportunity. they're they are essentially a partisan political positions of western progressives of the western left. come off as universal human rights. in the u.n. monitoring committee to france in 2000 make company said you're doing a good job unpolitical pairing. 50% of ca
the facts and make educated decisions. gerri: i have to say that i have looked at everything the president will have to tell you that a lot of people are describing this as aggressive. i think it's kind of a wiki. look at some of the language in some of the executive action. as in the president going to do this anyway? maximize enforcement efforts to prevent gun violence. i think at the end of the day, what is interesting about the president's demands is that they didn't go to the heart of what liberals will i am surprised that. >> he did talk about the fact that you have to take the high-capacity magazines don't attend. and at this point, they did not have an impact on the statistics of crime, but can you tell me what the constitutional violation was legal from 30 rounds to 10 rounds. is there something that is apparent in the? >> can answer that question? >> i can. there is a constitutional violation because when i was in the district of columbia, u.s. supreme court ruled that guns in common you should be allowed to be kept in ople's homes for self-defense. we all know that there are an
five? top three? caller code jobs, education, and for the end of the war. -- caller: jobs, education, for the war to end. host: let's hear the president speaking on the economy, social security, and medicare. caller: we the people -- [video clip] >> many barely make it. we believe that america's prosperity must rest upon the broad shoulders of a rising middle class. we know that america thrives when every person confined independence. on the wages of honest labor, liberating families from the brink of hardship. we are true to our creed, when a little girl born into bleakest poverty has the same chances to succeed as anyone else because she is an american, free and equal, not just in the eyes of god, but in our own eyes. we the people still believe that every citizen deserves a measure of security and dignity. we must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of health care and reduce the size of our deficits. but we reject the belief that america must choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future. [applause]
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